TaylorMade SIM MAX-D Driver

Best Golf Driver for Slice

by Mike R - Last Updated: September 4, 2020

We’ve all gone through a slice phase. We’ve all hated it. Today, there are clubs that can help with that. Below we profile five of the best golf driver for slice.  Choosing the TaylorMade SIM Max D wasn’t even a hard choice. Golfers that have sliced it their entire life keep it straight with this club, and they add more than 10 yards in the process. If you keep reading, you’ll find the club that’s going to help you eliminate your slice.

Slices are so common that brands cater specifically to players with this flaw. It’s almost like golf manufacturers are realizing there are more golfers that need help than can consistently put it in the fairway.

I don’t want to say they should have already known this already, but they needed to. Hanging out at the first tee of any course on an average Saturday morning would have told you this years ago. (See the breakfast ball)

When you slice, you’re losing distance. You also have a harder time hitting the fairway; this means more difficult approach shots. If you have the right club, you don’t have to change your swing. You also won’t waste your money recreating your swing through lessons with a pro. Instead, you’ll be spending a few hundred on a new driver.

With a driver built specifically for slicers, the club fixes your flaw. Finding more fairways means shorter and more direct shots into greens. If you can start from a better position with some type of regularity, your scores will go down.

Unlike gimmicky clubs of the past, these are USGA conforming. Look at that. The best golf driver for a slice can even be used in a tournament—who would have thought?

Top Pick: TaylorMade SIM Max D

If you want the best golf driver for a slice, you need to go to the top brands. In the last few decades, it’s fair to say TaylorMade has established itself as the one of, if not, the top brand around. The TaylorMade SIM Max D is further proof of this.

The “D” in SIM Max D signifies that it is engineered with a draw bias. This effect predominately comes from heel-bias internal weighting but does not stop there. Arguably the most effective feature is a divergent topline masking which makes the face look open at address. This will encourage you to close the face, and in turn, keep it closed when you hit the ball.

This club has a funky head shape. If you’re someone that needs a perfectly symmetrical head shape, you might struggle a bit. If you prefer results over aesthetics, you won’t mind too much. Due to the unique design, you can generate more club speed and maintain a smoother swing, all the while keeping your ball straighter.

Stock shaft for the TaylorMade SIM Max D is the UST Helium 5. This is a high launch and mid to high spin shaft that will help you launch the ball high and long. Due to the draw bias, you won’t have to worry (as much) about your ball floating too far off course once it’s up in the air.

What we liked

  • Comes in 9, 10.5 or 12 degrees and senior, regular and stiff flex. Just because it’s a draw bias doesn’t mean golfers of all kinds shouldn’t be able to benefit
  • Loft Sleeve Technology allows you to adjust loft and how open or closed the face is—a failsafe if you ever correct your slice swing

What we didn’t like

  • Larger club head than SIM and SIM Max models; ideal for players in need of game improvement, but could be distracting to low handicappers

Runner-Up: TaylorMade M6 D-Type

Another category, another standout option from TaylorMade. Like every other club they produce, the TaylorMade M6 D-Type is designed for the ball to fly off your club. The tried and true draw bias technology helps neutralize a slice swing. Hit the ball longer, have it stay straighter, tell me where to sign up.

We could give you the whole spiel about how it’s designed to encourage a draw and reduce a slice, but you already know this. I can tell you one thing for sure. It would not have made our best driver for a slice list if it didn’t check all the boxes.

What separates this from the competition is the addition of twist face technology. On a lot of clubs with draw bias, hitting it off-center takes away many of the helpful attributes. With twist face, side spin is reduced and power is maintained even when you miss the sweet spot entirely.

TaylorMade M6 D-Type drivers come with the Project X Evenflow Max Carry 45 shaft, which features a mid-kick point. This driver comes in senior, regular and stiff flex, as well as 9, 10.5, and 12 degrees.

What we liked

  • Low weighting in the clubhead creates more room for error by bringing the center of gravity and spin down while helping raise launch angle
  • Each head is injected with a resin that elevates speed assistance to highest levels allowed by USGA

What we didn’t like

  • Draw bias is very strong. This is for golfers with a slice only—not a golfer who drives the ball straight and wants to add a few yards with a slight draw

Top Pick for Ladies: Cobra King F9 Speedback

This is among the best driver for a slice, but for more reasons than it reduces the effects of bad contact. If we had to pick a favorite aspect of the King F9 Speedback, it would be the dual roll technology. With three types of milling, your ball will travel and spin forward. This is regardless of where you make contact on the clubface.

Speaking of milling, the face is curved so that having your club opened or closed at the impact it won’t matter as much. Doubling up, the club is weighted so that how open your club is, or off to the toe or heel, the club will correct your ball path. The outcome—you’ll stay on target and be in a better place for your approach to the green.

Female golfers don’t have as many options as male golfers. In our eyes, this is a major problem with a rapidly growing female golfing population. Thanks to an adjustable center of gravity in the King F9 Speedback, it’s like getting two drivers in one. At one weight setting, this is a mid/low launch club with low spin. Using the other setup, it is mid/high launch with mid-spin. To help with your slice, back position weighting (the second option) sets up as a draw bias.

Cobra King F9 Speedback drivers come with a Fujikura Atmos 5 shaft. A lightweight shaft, it is best suited for female golfers with moderate to fast swing speeds. If you’re on the edge with speed, the shaft itself will help you along thanks to a low kick point. With that, you’ll generate more speed at the bottom of your swing.

What we liked

  • Club is designed specifically for female golfers, rather than a men’s club with a different paint job
  • Carbon wrap cover reduces weight even further, helping you generate more speed

What we didn’t like

  • Only available for right-handed golfers and in 12.5 degrees—though loft is adjustable

Budget Option: Pinemeadow PGX Offset

Pinemeadow has a reputation as a golf club manufacturer that produces affordable clubs. It also has a reputation for their affordable clubs being good. When you want to save money, but continue to improve your game, you choose Pinemeadow.

Due to its budget, the Pinemeadow PGX Offset driver does not have a ton of fancy features. Instead, they keep things simple. In this case, simple means results.

For this driver, the standard, and the only loft is 10.5 degrees. Additionally, the shaft is a regular men’s flex made of graphite. No need for a big brand name when your goal is to keep the price down. If it works, it works. The clubhead is 460 cc’s putting it on the larger side, which also expands the sweet spot due to spread out weighting.

To help account for a slice, this Pinemeadow model is, as you might have guessed, offset. By closing the clubface and setting the club to appear more open than it actually is, it will encourage you to stay on the right path.

Pinemeadow makes a big deal of how their club looks, and for good reason. When you look down over your ball, you need something that instills confidence. A matte black finish and aerodynamic design give you something nice to look at, as well as helps you gain some swing speed.

What we liked

  • This is the best golf driver for a slice when you’re on a budget, bar-none
  • Great option for a beginner the wants to work on their swing, but does not want to invest a lot of money as they improve

What we didn’t like

  • No versatility when it comes to loft in terms of choice or on-shaft adjustments

Best for golfers going through a slice “phase”: Callaway Mavrik MAX

This is a category that benefits a lot of golfers and excludes hardly any. Callaway Mavrik MAX is versatile in the sense that it comes with countless settings. It also caters to golfers in need of game improvement.

Of all the drivers in the Callaway Mavrik line, this is designed to produce the most extreme draws. Additionally, it features a high launch and mid spin design. Getting back to the game improvement aspect, this is a club that helps you hit it higher and longer while reducing your slice.

Callaway drivers are designed with something called jailbreak bars. Essentially, the bars connect the sole and crown of your driver, strengthening the face and redistributing weight. The end result is fast ball speed, more distance off the tee, and consistent contact.

Depending on the loft and stiffness you choose, there are two shaft options. The UST Helium Black shaft is preferred by some due to its low weight. Traditionally, it fits seniors, ladies, and golfers with slower swing speeds. If you can crank it up a little, the other option is the Project X Evenflow Riptide shaft. As long as you know your swing speed, it’s tough to go wrong with either of these.

What we liked

  • If you grow out of your slice phase (we hope you do), the adjustable features permit you to use the same club, rather than buying something new to fit your swing
  • Flash face technology helps to maintain ball speed, even on off-center contact

What we didn’t like

  • While this does help with forgiveness and slice reduction, adjustable weights make you choose between the two to focus on. It does not wipe out the effect of the other option, but it does become less of a factor

Best Golf Driver for Slice Takeaways

If you want the best golf driver for a slice, you need to know what you’re looking for. For us, it comes down to a few things. At a bare minimum, you need a club that has a draw bias. Clubs with an offset design and adjustable settings also help as they can account for varying levels of slicing.

Another major thing you need to look out for is who the driver is designed for. Clubs are made for low-handicap golfers, senior golfers, lady golfers, and everyone in between. If you have the option available and budget to choose one specifically for the type of golfer you are—take it.

To finish things off, even with the best golf driver for a slice, you need to do some work on your own. Find out what a slice is. Find out what you’re doing to cause your slice. And of course, find a way to fix your slice. Even with the help of a club, it will continue to creep back if you don’t make swing adjustments.

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